What is Mental Health?

Mental health still has a negative connotation. Many wrongly use the concept interchangeably with mental illness or a mental condition. But just as everyone has a physical health status, they also have a mental health status — and just as people should be proactive about their physical health, they should be proactive about their mental health, too.

Anyone can experience poor mental health or wellbeing. This doesn’t indicate a mental illness, which is a clinically diagnosed disorder. There will always be times when people feel stressed, anxious, or depressed, and it’s important that everyone has the tools to manage these negative mental states. Health isn’t an on/off switch; there are different degrees of health. People move on a continuum from good mental health to poor mental health. When these periods of poor mental health become more frequent or harder to shift, then it can turn into a diagnosed mental illness (such as anxiety or depression).

Historically, mental health has been a delicate topic. Employers and HR managers alike may find it a difficult and awkward conversation to broach, and may not know how to help employees who are exhibiting signs of poor mental health.

But how do we specifically define mental health and mental wellbeing? Mental health and mental wellbeing directly relate to the social and emotional wellbeing of individuals and communities. When it comes to workplace mental health, “mental health” may include how workers feel at work and how they feel at home.

On the other hand, mental illness is a diagnosed disorder which occurs when people are struggling with their mental health. There is a full breadth of potential mental illness, and employers are not adequately equipped to diagnose mental illness on their own. Not everyone struggles with mental illness at some point in their lives. For those that choose to disclose their condition, it is an employer’s job to give employees options and resources.

While everyone has “mental health,” not everyone has a mental illness. Further, “mental illness” and a lack of mental health can occur on an incredibly broad spectrum. One employee’s experience of “stress” may be entirely disparate from another employee’s experience of “stress.” Employees may also encounter different mental health challenges based on gender or background.

What challenges does it tackle?

Reducing onsite accidents

These cost Australian businesses $61.2B a year.

Reducing onsite accidents

These cost Australian businesses $61.2B a year.

Reducing onsite accidents

These cost Australian businesses $61.2B a year.

Reducing onsite accidents

These cost Australian businesses $61.2B a year.

How it works

Our qualified professionals coach and educate your team to recognise your body’s warning signs that signal it’s time for a physical and mental reset. Delivered onsite, your team can put theory into action within their own work environment, which increases uptake and memorability while recruiting champions from within your team helps the change become part of the culture.

We understand every workplace is unique, so we use a 4-step approach to understand exactly where we need to focus.